Connect with us

Science

Internet, the Aladdin’s cave of knowledge

Published

on

Rate this post

 The internet is a wonderful tool for sharing knowledge. Any subject you choose can be covered in its numerous aspects and contexts, in either a few words or 300 pages, making it proper for beginner and expert alike.

google.co.in

Take the word ‘hand’, for instance. It gives accessibility to websites on function, prehistory (walking on two legs and manual dexterity), art (drawing, sculpting), lateralisation ( left-handedness and right-handedness), fortune telling (lines on the hand), beauty (manicure), medical topics ( disorders, injuries, exercises, surgery, hygiene), not to mention second-hand goods and many commercial brands using this word.

Via: blogspot.com

But this avalanche of readily available data is a double-edged sword. It undoubtedly does offer a monumental store of information, with links that allow us to move from one subject to another, wherever our curiosity leads, and it provides us access to enhancing interactive opportunities (such as being able to ask questions or express an opinion).

On the flip side, the information is not categorized, ordered or arranged in any order of importance, and its accuracy can’t be established. This can leave us entirely confused and make it extremely hard to get the information we need and to get a general idea of the subject we are researching.

Via: images.idgesg.net

And there’s another important question: what place should the internet have in education? Do we actually need to make an effort to memorise information when it is frequently accessible on the web? More generally, the more we use these tools to help our memory, are we actually running the risk of weakening it?

Via: indiacelebrating.com

Whatever the case, our brains have adapted to these aids by developing new skills to deal with them and use them better.  According to the results of a study conducted at the University of California and published in 2008, using search engines on the internet may even be of benefit to brain function!

Continue Reading

Health

Usage of Mobile Phones may lead to Brain Cancer

Published

on

Rate this post

New studies from Sweden on the effects of rays raises fears that today’s youth face an outbreak of the disease in later life.

Via:articles.mercola.com

Children and youngsters are five times more likely to get brain cancer if they use cell phones, startling new studies indicates.
The study, professionals say, increases fears that today’s youngsters may suffer an “epidemic” of the disease in later life. At least 9/10 British 16-year-olds have their own device, as do more than 40 % of primary schoolchildren. Yet analyzing threats to the youth has been omitted from a huge £3.1m British investigation of the danger of cancer from using cell phones, launched this year, even though the official Mobile Telecommunications and Health Research (MTHR) Programme – which is performing it – admits that the problem is of the “highest priority”.Despite suggestions of an official report that the use of mobiles by kids should be “decreased”, the Govt has done almost nothing to discourage it.

 

It sprung from a further research of data from one of the biggest research carried out into the risk that the mobile rays cause cancer, headed by Professor Lennart Hardell of the University Hospital in Orebro, Sweden. Professor Hardell informed that “people who started mobile phone use before the age of 20″ had more than five-fold increase in glioma”, a cancer of the glial cells that assist the central nervous system. The extra threat to adolescents of contracting the disease from using the mobile phone found in many homes was almost as great, at more than four times higher.

Via:motherjones.com

He further added that those who began using mobiles young were also five times more likely to get acoustic neuromas, harmless but often disabling tumors of the auditory nerve, which usually cause hearing problems. Contrary to this, people who were in their 20s before using mobiles were only 50% more likely to contract gliomas and twice as likely to get acoustic neuromas.

Despite all this nothing has been done, and their use by the youngsters has more than doubled since the turn of the millennium.

Continue Reading

Features

Do You Have A Good EYESIGHT?

Published

on

Good eyesight
Rate this post

Sight is important for moving and carrying out most actions, but what does having ‘good eyesight’ actually mean? Is it simply a matter of effectively seeing what is around us as we perceive it through light, or is the process much more complex?

Good eyesight

What is the Sight?

Like the other senses, sight consists of the perception of an outside stimulus- in this case, electromagnetic waves and the brain’s interpretation of what has been thought of. Being able to see doesn’t mean just seeing the ambient light, but also- and perhaps most significantly- recognizing objects and movements.

Optical illusions, which could be referred to as errors in interpretation, provide tangible evidence of the role the brain plays in producing sight.

Powers of observation

Good eyesight

Visual acuity is essential, but it’s not enough. To see well, you also have to grasp what is important in what you have seen, without missing anything, and you should also keep in mind what has just been seen. These are abilities that correspond to two kinds of question:

1.’ What are you looking at?’ or ‘Have you noticed this?’

Questions like these demand the ability to recognize objects, as well as good observation skills.

2.’What did you just see?’ This calls on the visual memory.

In an ever-changing world, someone with excellent eyes but no visual memory would effectively see nothing.

An Eagle Eye

Ophthalmologists explain visual acuity as the ability to distinguish an object placed as far away as possible or to see the smallest possible object. This means that visual acuity is associated to the minimum angle required for the rays of light emitted by an object to reach the retina at the back of the eye.

Good eyesight

Via: google.com

Ophthalmologists calculate the angle using standardized charts that have letters figures of different sizes. The result is expressed as a score between 1 and 20, with 20 representing normal eyesight; it is even possible to have a visual acuity score above 20.

Continue Reading

Science

‘Super blue blood moon’: Visible on Jan 31, 2018

Published

on

blue blood moon
Rate this post

Blue moon, super moon and blood moon combine to create moment not seen in the skies in more than 150 years

Super Blood Blue Moon

A rare celestial event will grace the skies during the coming week when a blue moon and lunar eclipse combine with the moon being at its closest point to Earth, leading to what is being called a “super blue blood moon”.
A “super blood blue moon” is an outcome of a super moon: a full moon appears mainly big and bright since it’s closer to Earth; a blue moon: the second full moon in a calendar month; and a lunar eclipse: the moon passes into Earth’s shadow.

This trifecta will take place on 31 January. The last time these three elements put together at the same time was in 1866. The West Coast, Alaska and Hawaii have the front side row seats for the supermoon, but Northern Colorado will get a far better look than those in the central U.S. and East Coast.

When should I watch?

Stargazers in the US will be capable to see the eclipse before sunrise on Wednesday, according to Nasa. For those in the Middle East, Asia, eastern Russia, Australia and New Zealand, the event will be visible during moonrise on the morning of 31 January.

The eclipse itself is expected to last about an hour and a quarter. For anyone unable to watch the event in person, it will be streamed live online.

“For the [continental] the US, the viewing will be best in the west,” said Gordon Johnston, program executive and lunar blogger at Nasa. “Set your alarm early and go out and take a look.”

“Weather permitting, the west coast, Alaska, and Hawaii will have a spectacular view of totality from start to finish,” said Johnston. “However, eclipse seeing will be more difficult in the eastern time zone. The eclipse begins at 5.51am ET, as the moon is about to set in the western sky, and the sky is getting lighter in the east.”

What will I see?

The eclipse begins when the umbra — the dark, central region of Earth’s shadow — touches the moon’s edge. The moon will dim and “take on an eerie, fainter-than-normal glow from the scant sunlight that makes its way through Earth’s atmosphere,” according to NASA.

The moon will look reddish because of the way the atmosphere bends the light, which is why people call total lunar eclipses “blood moons.”

“We’re seeing all of the Earth’s sunrises and sunsets at that moment reflected from the surface of the moon,” said Sarah Noble, a NASA program scientist, in a news release.

And because it’s a supermoon, the moon will be about 14 percent brighter and 7 percent bigger than usual full moons. That aspect of the Super Blue Blood Moon will be less noticeable to the naked eye than its red color, but it’s still pretty cool.

blue blood moon

via:.ndtvimg.com

This is all assuming the forecast cooperates. It’s too soon to tell whether Wednesday morning will be cloudy, so check back with the Coloradoan for weather updates.

Where should I go?

The moon should be high enough in the sky to view anywhere in Northern Colorado, so you can just watch it from home if you want. Going somewhere scenic with less urban light couldn’t hurt. Bring binoculars or a small telescope if you want an up-close look.

Front Range Community College will open its Sunlight Peak Observatory for moon-viewing Wednesday morning from 4:45 to 6:30. Dress warmly, as the observatory isn’t heated. It’s located on the Larimer Campus at Harmony Road and Shields Street in Fort Collins.

What if I can’t watch?

NASA’s got your back. They’ll be live streaming the lunar eclipse at https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive, a good option if Wednesday morning turns out to be cloudy, and you can follow the eclipse on Twitter @NASAMoon. The Coloradoan staff will also be capturing the event, so check out coloradoan.com Wednesday morning.

Nasa said the eclipse will offer scientists a chance to see what happens when the surface of the moon cools quickly.

“The whole character of the moon changes when we observe with a thermal camera during an eclipse,” said Paul Hayne of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado Boulder. “In the dark, many familiar craters and other features can’t be seen, and the normally nondescript areas around some craters start to ‘glow’ because the rocks there are still warm.”

Continue Reading

Trending